The Night Travelers

Last summer, I was excited to learn that Armando Lucas Correa had a new novel on the horizon, The Night Travelers. A few years ago I had picked up his debut novel, The German Girl, and his latest release returns to the same themes of escaping 1930s Germany on the St. Louis, a ship bound... Continue Reading →

Badon Hill

Earlier this year I was happy to read Gurzil by I, Anonymous. The first in the Wars of Wrath series, it ended on a cliffhanger, so I was eager to see what would happen next. The second installment is Badon Hill, a transitional book that sets up what is sure to be an exciting end.... Continue Reading →

Godmersham Park

I always enjoy reading historical fiction about real-life figures, and especially about the people adjacent to someone more famous, so I was excited to read Godmersham Park by Gill Hornby. It follows the years that Anne Sharp worked as a governess for the Austen family at their home in Kent. While there, she met her... Continue Reading →

In the Shadow of a Queen

More and more lately, I've enjoyed reading about historical figures who are adjacent to someone who is more famous or remembered. I've read about the lesser known Mozart composer, then Marie Antoinette's older sister, and now Queen Victoria's daughter, Louise. Heather B. Moore's latest novel, In the Shadow of a Queen, highlights the princess who... Continue Reading →

Haven

Earlier this year, I was thrilled to get an advanced copy of Haven by Emma Donoghue, due out in two weeks. Set in Ireland, it takes readers back in time to about 600 C.E., onto small, isolated rock of an island. It follows a trio of monks as they attempt to make this harsh island... Continue Reading →

The Daughter of Doctor Moreau

Silvia Moreno-Garcia is officially an auto-buy author for me. Since my introduction to her with Gods of Jade and Shadow in 2019, I've read three more of her novels and her recent short story, The Tiger Came to the Mountains. I've loved everything so far, and I could hardly wait for her newest book, The... Continue Reading →

Miss Aldridge Regrets

There's a new historical mystery out today, set on a ship in summer 1936: Miss Aldridge Regrets by Louise Hare. If you're looking for dubiously linked murders, a calculated setup, a bit of music, and an examination of race, this is the book for you. Special thanks to the publicists at Penguin Random House and... Continue Reading →

A Dress of Violet Taffeta

One of my most anticipated historical fiction novels this summer is A Dress of Violet Taffeta by Tessa Arlen. Inspired by a real woman who became an acclaimed fashion designer, it's a novel of beautiful gowns, a second chance at love, and survival in a rapidly changing world. I was pleased to get an ARC... Continue Reading →

The Scent of Burnt Flowers

Earlier this year, I was enchanted by the cover of Blitz Bazawule's debut novel, The Scent of Burnt Flowers. The summary was similarly intriguing, so I requested it on NetGalley. I was thrilled when I was approved for an advanced copy of the book. The Scent of Burnt Flowers is out now, and if you... Continue Reading →

The Fountains of Silence

In 2019, I picked up the Book of the Month edition of The Fountains of Silence by Ruta Sepetys. I've been itching to read it ever since, and finally, while doing my Spain reading challenge this month, I decided now was the time. This novel, on the cusp between Adult and Young Adult fiction, takes... Continue Reading →

Bloomsbury Girls

Two years ago, Natalie Jenner released her debut novel, The Jane Austen Society. It became a bestseller, and now readers can enjoy her latest novel: Bloomsbury Girls. While it features some characters first seen in The Jane Austen Society - and references some events therein - it also works as a standalone. It's an inspiring... Continue Reading →

The Murder of Mr. Wickham

One of my most anticipated books this month was The Murder of Mr. Wickham by Claudia Gray. It's the Jane Austen-inspired cozy mystery I never knew I needed, featuring some of her best-known characters as well as brand new faces. I was thrilled to get an early copy of the book, and now that it's... Continue Reading →

The Mad Girls of New York

A few years ago, I watched a movie about Nellie Bly and her famous undercover commitment to a women's asylum. Up until then, I had never heard of her, but it was a fascinating and eye-opening account. Earlier this year, I was excited to learn of an upcoming book based on her: The Mad Girls... Continue Reading →

Antoinette’s Sister

Last summer, I loved Diana Giovinazzo's debut novel, The Woman in Red, and I've been anticipating her second book ever since. In January, she released her new historical fiction, Antoinette's Sister. Although I won it in a giveaway in December (yay!), my book didn't arrive until February (sad!)... But no matter - I've finally gotten to... Continue Reading →

The Lady Tempts an Heir

Last year, two of my favorite books were The Heiress Gets a Duke and The Devil and the Heiress, both part of Harper St. George's Gilded Age Heiresses series. These historical romances bring heat and charm as well as thoughtful examinations of women's rights in the 1870s. I've been eagerly awaiting the next two books... Continue Reading →

The Siren of Sussex

For several months, I've been eagerly anticipating the release of The Siren of Sussex by Mimi Matthews. The first in her new Belles of London series, I was drawn to several things that make it stand out compared to other historical romances: It stars a half-Indian protagonist, features an interracial and interclass relationship, and highlights... Continue Reading →

The Kingdom of Back

It was March 2020 when I became enchanted by The Kingdom of Back by Marie Lu. Book of the Month offered it as one of their add-on selections that month, and although it hadn't previously been on my radar, it immediately went right into my box. Finally, just after reading another book about Mozart (The... Continue Reading →

The Mozart Code

Several months ago I learned about Rachel McMillan's upcoming novel, The Mozart Code. I love music - including classical composers like Mozart - and was intrigued by the dual setting of Vienna and Prague. Fast forward to December, and I was excited to learn I'd been approved for an ARC of The Mozart Code on... Continue Reading →

The Spanish Daughter

Last month, I was thrilled to win an ARC of The Spanish Daughter by Lorena Hughes. It was already one of my most anticipated books of December (it will be out on the 28th), so I was excited to get a chance to read it early. Spoiler: I loved it! This is definitely a book... Continue Reading →

The Mad Women’s Ball

Early in September, I found out about a newly translated book that was just published in English, The Mad Women's Ball by Victoria Mas. Already out in French for two years, the book has even been adapted into a film. The premise of it piqued my interest, and I'm always excited to read translations, so... Continue Reading →

Velvet Was the Night

I think I'm officially a Silvia Moreno-Garcia fan. I've read, and loved, three of her books: Gods of Jade and Shadow in 2019, Mexican Gothic in 2020, and just a few weeks ago, a reprint of The Beautiful Ones. Two months ago, her newest book, Velvet Was the Night, came out. A noir thriller set... Continue Reading →

Silent Winds, Dry Seas

Thanks to a local independent book store, Silent Winds, Dry Seas - the debut novel by Vinod Busjeet - was on my radar among books being published in August. Once it was out, I decided that the audiobook version might be the most satisfying format, and I'm glad I chose to read it that way.... Continue Reading →

The Devil and the Heiress

Six months ago, I finished reading The Heiress Gets a Duke, the first in Harper St. George's Gilded Age Heiresses series. I really enjoyed it, and I was thrilled to learn that the second book in the series, The Devil and the Heiress, would be published so soon after. This followup has been one of... Continue Reading →

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